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Students from Sinclair Community College civil engineering technologies program, Zachary Osterday, left, and Christopher Hess, talk about surveying work they completed at onMain - Dayton’s Imagination District during a two-semester lab project. TY GREENLEES / STAFF Photo: Ty Greenlees, Dayton Daily News

Local Students Get Chance to Pitch Fairground Redevelopment Plans

By | News
Dec 03, 2018
By Holly Shively, Staff Writer
Dayton Daily News

Local engineering students will pitch designs that could be used in the former Montgomery County Fairgrounds redevelopment.

Six University of Dayton and eight Sinclair Community College students are working on a two-semester capstone project that uses the 38-acre site on South Main Street as a lab. This semester, the students spent several days a week collecting data at the property. In January, the student teams will begin drawings and plans for residential and commercial buildings, waste and stormwater management, traffic, landscaping, lighting and parking.

“What we believe our contribution would be is offering some ideas and visions and a perspective that is different than a consulting firm,” said Don Chase, the University of Dayton director of undergraduate studies for civil and environmental engineering and faculty adviser for the project.

The students aren’t licensed yet, meaning the planning firm overseeing the redevelopment — planning NEXT — won’t be able to take the plans as is, Chase said, but he hopes some of the elements the students propose will be built into the ultimate plans.

“One of the things that’s proposed is residence halls. They are students and they’re connected right now with some of the needs students have with regards to housing,” Chase said.

The students are also environmentally aware and conscious, helping to add insight on an aesthetically pleasing and sustainable site, he added, fitting the standards the onMain partners have set.

Premier Health and the University of Dayton bought the former fairgrounds in April 2017, for $15 million. Each institution spent $5.25 million and Montgomery County and the Dayton-Montgomery County Port Authority contributed the rest.

In early October, the partners announced plans to rename the site onMain: Dayton’s Imagination District. Plans for redevelopment, which could take 10 to 15 years to complete in phases, include retail space, housing and buildings for employment.

Other elements of the redevelopment include a walkable urban neighborhood, retail geared toward those who work and live onMain, environmentally sustainable buildings, urban agriculture and restoration of the property’s historic Roundhouse.

Second-year Sinclair civil engineering students Zachary Osterday and Christopher Hess said they understand the appeal of the environment onMain aims for — to be able to live, work and play all in one urban community. The lifestyle has become popular among Millennials and Baby Boomers who want everything within walking distance.

“Restaurants, movie, theaters, stores, retail, all in the same area, kind of like The Greene is what I’m thinking,” Hess said.

The partnership between Sinclair and University of Dayton students also will teach the students how to communicate with surveyors, architects, civil engineers and construction managers as each group of students works on a different aspect of the project.

“Design scenarios such as this produce high-quality learning experiences that no classroom lecture could ever produce,” said Eric Dunn, chair of Sinclair’s engineering technology department. “This project will give students a taste of how to follow and maintain a client’s architectural and overall site vision while also conforming to federal, state and local design standards.”

Premier and UD are searching for redevelopment funding sources, which could take at least one to two years before any new construction could occur, according to a statement.

“This was real world experience … Obviously the professor supervised, but we were kind of left to our own devices. So we had to come up with our own system for collecting data, and it was really cool because that’s what you’d actually be doing out in the real world.”


Photo credit: Students from Sinclair Community College civil engineering technologies program, Zachary Osterday, left, and Christopher Hess, talk about surveying work they completed at onMain – Dayton’s Imagination District during a two-semester lab project. TY GREENLEES / STAFF Photo: Ty Greenlees, Dayton Daily News

UD Announces Plan To Redevelop Fairgrounds

By | News

Project partners UD and Premier Health announced on Oct. 2 that what was known as Montgomery County Fairgrounds will become a mixed-use, walkable neighborhood containing residential spaces, offices and gathering places. Its new name is onMain.

UD and Premier Health purchased Fairgrounds, an area adjacent to campus, on April 14, 2017. The land was sold to them for $15 million. UD and Premier each paid $5.25 million; the remaining cost was supplemented by Montgomery County and a state grant.

You can find what will be onMain by going to Fitz Hall, crossing the street to Flanagan’s Pub and walking a block toward the river. It will be boxed in by Patterson, Apple, Stewart and Main streets.

According to Cilla Shindell, the UD contact for information about onMain, the residential spaces will not be available as student housing; this is not another student neighborhood. Instead, there will be mix-income apartments available for rent by Dayton residents. These apartments especially will be intended for those who work at any of the businesses at onMain. Anyone living there with UD ties would be a graduate or UD faculty.

Provost Paul Benson confirmed there is no plan for classes to be held on the site.

Being next to the river and a mile from downtown Dayton, onMain will increase access to different parts of the city. The intention is for onMain to be pedestrian friendly.

“onMain should bridge UD’s campus with the downtown Dayton core, filling a geographical gap that has long separated Stewart Street from the heart of Dayton’s downtown,” Benson said.

The neighborhood will include urban agriculture on the western end of the site (along Patterson Street), as well as on the building rooftops. The structures will be designed in an environmentally-sustainable way.

Shindell said “to fully build out the project could take up to 15 to 20 years, hundreds of millions of dollars and involve numerous partners.”

What students will see crop up in the initial phase of construction (in about 3 or 4 years, according to Shindell) is the catalytic building.

“We envision the early catalytic building as having a research focus, both for enterprises that might be directly affiliated with UD and/or with Premier Health, but also for research-focused companies in Dayton looking for additional office space with access to flexible high-bay laboratory spaces,” Benson said. “This sort of environment will need student talent during UD students’ educations and after they graduate.”

Construction will begin at the corner of Stewart and Main, with the catalytic building, and will progress along the edges. The projects with longer timelines will be in the center of the site.

They also “have started outreach to potential funding sources to help fund initial phases of the redevelopment, including roadways, utilities, water and sewer and removal of some structures,” Shindell said.

The 38-acre site has the potential to increase the number of and diversify the types of businesses in Dayton, as well as create more jobs.

“It will be a platform to attract businesses and entrepreneurs to bring jobs and opportunities to the area as well as a sustainable and inclusive living environment with an emphasis on wellness,” said UD President Eric Spina.

Fairgrounds, now onMain, is not the only site UD is involved in redeveloping. The university also in investing money in the Dayton Arcade, which is in downtown Dayton.

Because it’s estimated to take 15 to 20 years to complete, current students won’t reap the benefits from onMain. But maybe we’ll get to see how it turns out when we visit our kids for family weekend.


Alexandra Scherb
Contributing Writer
Flyer News
November 5, 2018

Premier Health, University of Dayton Unveil New Name, Vision for Former Montgomery County Fairgrounds

By | News

DAYTON, Ohio, October 2, 2018 — The former Montgomery County fairgrounds has a new name and a new direction as a place that fosters imagination, innovation and inclusivity.

Premier Health and the University of Dayton today announced a new name for the 38 acres at the northwest corner of Main and Stewart streets — onMain: Dayton’s Imagination District — embodying a vision for the site as a place where Dayton’s history of innovation takes off into the future.

“The name represents the best of Dayton’s future as well as its history of innovation,” said University President Eric F. Spina. “It will be a platform to attract businesses and entrepreneurs to bring jobs and opportunities to the area as well as a sustainable and inclusive living environment with an emphasis on wellness.”

Appropriately, the name — onMain — emerged from focus groups and conversations with members of the Dayton community who helped brainstorm ways a new name might express the community’s aspirations for this important development, said Mary Boosalis, president and CEO of Premier Health.

“The name marks the district’s location on Main Street, and is an invitation to live onMain, work onMain, learn onMain and meet onMain,” Boosalis said. “We envision a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use development with a distinct identity and personality that is open, welcoming and creative and complements the rebirth and momentum of downtown Dayton.”

Boosalis and Spina said the long-term vision for the district will take up to 15 to 20 years to fully realize, with the partners committed to developing the 38 acres as a sustainable neighborhood for economic development. As anchor institutions, UD and Premier don’t have the profit and time pressures that typical developers do.

The two institutions’ long-term vision for the property allows for flexibility but reflects the input of more than 850 members of the community through the broad-based Fairgrounds to Future planning process. Key elements of the vision include:

  • A truly walkable urban neighborhood with places to work, live and gather.
  • A focus on creative, innovation and entrepreneurial activities and jobs — retail will be geared to serve those who live and work onMain. The district is not intended to be a retail and shopping destination.
  • Mixed-income housing that offers opportunities for residents to live close to where they work.
  • Design standards for buildings that integrate environmental sustainability and wellness, reflecting the mission and values of the two institutions.
  • onMain’s employers, entertainment venues and housing will draw a diverse mix of people who are representative of the broader Dayton community and its vibrant neighborhoods.
  • onMain’s initial phase will focus on creating a critical mass of employment, housing, retail, and other uses at the south end of the site along Main Street.
  • Urban agriculture would be located on land at the western end of the site and on building rooftops.
  • Restoration of the property’s historic Roundhouse.
  • A “catalytic” building would be built at the northwest corner of Stewart and Main streets to spur development.

 

“The vision for onMain is transformative for Dayton,” said Jamie Greene, principal of planning NEXT, the planning firm hired to lead the process that culminated in the vision. “It is unlike any place in the region or the state, for that matter, with the integration of innovation-oriented employment opportunities, unique housing choices, active community gathering spaces and easy access to the river, bike trails and the core of downtown.

 

“Many communities — larger and smaller than Dayton — have significant anchor institutions, but few are providing this type of commitment and leadership. The University of Dayton and Premier Health leaned into the planning process over the past year and are now leaning into deliberate and thoughtful implementation actions,” he said.

As is typical with large, complex development projects that involve many community partners, a complete transformation of the property will occur in phases.

Premier Health and the University are taking steps to create a nonprofit development organization to manage the development process and provide day-to-day oversight of the property.

The two institutions purchased the 38-acre site in 2017 and have been working on a long-range vision for the property that builds upon their institutional missions and values, promotes economic development, and fosters a unique sense of place that serves broad community interests.

Outreach to potential funding sources has begun, a process that is likely to take at least 12 to 24 months before any new construction might occur on the property. Such partnerships could fund initial phases of the redevelopment, including roadways, utilities, water and sewer, and removal of some structures.

*****

Contact:

Cilla Shindell | University of Dayton | pshindell1@udayton.edu | 937-367-2889

Ben Sutherly | Premier Health | bwsutherly@premierhealth.com | 937-524-3264

Fairgrounds to Future Enters New Phase

By | News

Financing, Making Site Development Ready Will Be Key Focus in Coming Months

The planning process for the redevelopment of the former Montgomery County fairgrounds has entered a new phase.

The property’s owners, Premier Health and the University of Dayton, are taking the steps necessary to make the 38 acres ready for development and to complete a long-term vision for the property’s transformation.

Outreach to potential funding sources has begun, a process that is likely to take at least 12 to 24 months before any new construction might occur on the property. Such partnerships could fund initial phases of the property’s redevelopment, including roadways, utilities, water and sewer, and selective demolition of existing structures.
In addition, as they finalize the preliminary vision unveiled in January, Premier Health and the University are creating the governance structure needed for day-to-day oversight as the project unfolds.

As is typical with large, complex development projects that involve many community partners, a complete transformation of the property will occur in phases and could take 15 to 20 years to achieve the full vision across all of the developable land. Premier Health and the University purchased the 38-acre site in 2017 and have been working on a long-range vision for the property that builds upon their institutional missions and values, promotes economic development, and fosters a unique sense of place that serves broad community interests.

The intermediate steps toward financing and implementation follow a broad-based planning process through which more than 850 people offered ideas, feedback and comments. Input came from meetings with the public and key stakeholders and was carefully considered in developing a preliminary vision for the property’s redevelopment.

“This is not your typical capital development,” said Mary Boosalis, CEO and president of Premier Health. “We have an ambitious vision that will take considerable public and private support to realize. As we said from the beginning, we want to do this right versus fast, and that will take time.”

“As is standard in any new development, our early emphasis is putting in place the resources and partnerships to support and ensure the success of the vision we introduced in January,” said University President Eric F. Spina. “The vision remains the same: to create a vibrant, mixed-use development that builds on Dayton’s history of innovation and entrepreneurship and can propel our next wave of jobs and opportunity.”

While Premier Health and Encompass Health construct a freestanding rehabilitation hospital north of the former fairgrounds near Miami Valley Hospital, hospital employees will temporarily utilize a portion of the north end of the property for parking.

Following the recent transfer of possession of the 38 acres this spring to Premier Health and UD from the Montgomery County Agricultural Society, passersby are seeing some changes to the property, including the installation of landscaping and iron gates.

Other activities also will be occurring on the property as necessary to prepare it for redevelopment. Selective demolition of some structures may occur during the second half of 2018, but will not include the historic Roundhouse, which will be preserved. A property management firm has been hired to maintain the grounds and keep buildings secure.

Vision for Former Fairgrounds Begins to Take Shape

By | News

The University of Dayton and Premier Health have sketched out a preliminary vision for the former Montgomery County fairgrounds for a new kind of neighborhood that builds on Dayton’s history of innovation and entrepreneurship and can propel the region’s next wave of jobs and opportunity.

A 24-hour place where people live, work, learn and play, it should be a walkable neighborhood that integrates sustainability, advanced technology and unique amenities. Most of all, it should act as an innovation platform, where creative ideas for health care, energy, education, housing, business creation and thriving neighborhoods can be demonstrated and tested.

That’s the preliminary shape of a vision for the 38-acre site on South Main Street shared with community members at the fairgrounds on Jan. 25 by planning NEXT, the urban design firm working to develop a master plan for the area. Mary Boosalis, Premier Health president and CEO, and Eric F. Spina, University of Dayton president, were on hand to hear directly from community members.

“There is a great deal of excitement about where we are,” Spina said. “The overall direction and thrust identified by planning NEXT feel authentic and right for the site and for Dayton. We’re beginning to see the shape of a place that’s unique and like no other in the region.”

Boosalis said: “We know the proper development of the site for long-term regional impact will require support and investment from a variety of sources that see opportunities in the involvement of a leading health system and leading university on a site across the street from Miami Valley Hospital, a block from UD and less than a mile from downtown.”

They thanked all who participated in the planning process through which 42 groups and more than 600 people generated more than 1,300 ideas. The input was carefully considered and very valuable, they said.

Jamie Greene, principal of planning NEXT, said the input and research to date were distilled into 12 principles — or value statements — for the overall development of the site and asked participants to indicate how strongly the principles reflected their thoughts.

“We found there’s a development type missing from the region and the region risks losing certain kinds of jobs in emerging, creative, tech-based companies because we don’t have the kind of setting they’re looking for,” Greene said. “There is a demand for places where people can live closer to where there are jobs in research, technology and innovation.”

Historically known for innovation and entrepreneurship, the Stewart and Main area sits between UD and Miami Valley Hospital — two significant sources of innovation and advanced technology — and could be a place where the research interests of the University connect with Premier Health’s interest in applied technology. As a result, research, development, testing and evaluation could be enhanced in ways that benefit both institutions, Greene said.

Greene also shared a preliminary vision for the physical appearance and layout of the development that includes mixed-income housing; streets in a grid pattern; high quality public spaces such as plazas and green space; retention of the Roundhouse as a focal point; active sidewalks and places for people; institutional and office uses; retail aimed at serving the neighborhood; and creative urban agriculture.

Beyond the physical structure, Greene suggested the buildings and infrastructure of the development can exemplify the core values of the vision.

“This is not just another real estate project; this will be much more meaningful than that,” Greene said. “The buildings themselves should incorporate advanced technology and should represent an advanced approach to energy and applied technology such as sensors and autonomous vehicles.”

Spina and Boosalis emphasized much work remains to be done on the master plan. With the distinctive opportunities presented by the likely shape of the vision, the institutions will take time to analyze the next steps. Once the planning process is completed, UD and Premier Health expect to begin working with development and community partners to put together the pieces necessary to begin the first phase, including financing, for a multiyear, phased development.

Premier Health and UD see their role as helping to set the stage for the development of this one-of-a-kind neighborhood and platform for the future in a way that attracts partners and investors who want to be a part of the unique opportunity it presents and who bring an adventurous mindset and complementary assets.

With the vision, Boosalis and Spina said the two institutions intend to create a neighborhood that evokes Dayton’s history of innovation and serves as a platform that once again puts the community’s creativity and ingenuity to work in creating the future.

To learn more about the preliminary vision for the development, including the 12 principles and other material presented at the workshop, visit FairgroundstoFuture.org.

Public Invited to Jan. 25 Workshop on Fairgrounds Vision

By | News

The Dayton community is invited to attend an interactive workshop detailing progress toward creating a community-minded vision for the former Montgomery County fairgrounds from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 25 at the fairgrounds Coliseum. The workshop is free and open to the public.

Premier Health and the University of Dayton purchased the 38-acre property on Dayton’s South Main Street last year, and launched a planning process to create a vision for its development to serve both anchor institutions’ missions, contribute to the region’s economic growth and address community needs.

At the Jan. 25 event, planning NEXT, the Columbus, Ohio, firm managing the planning process for the two institutions will share more about the shape of the overall vision and key principles for the overall development of the site distilled from ideas contributed by community members last fall.

Premier Health President and CEO Mary Boosalis and University of Dayton President Eric F. Spina said they look forward to checking in with the community and hearing how well those principles capture what was heard from the community through the planning process. They said they are pleased with the process so far and the spirit of collaboration with community partners.

During the planning process, more than 42 community groups and more than 600 people generated more than 1,300 distinct ideas. Upon completion of the planning process the partners expect to begin working with development and community partners to put together the pieces necessary to begin the first phase, including financing, for a multiyear, phased development.

To RSVP for the workshop and learn more about the project, including input from community members, visit www.FairgroundstoFuture.org. 

Get to know Premier Health and the University of Dayton

By | News

Premier Health and the University of Dayton, the two institutions behind the Fairgrounds to Future process, have strong traditions of service and giving back to the Dayton community. Get to know their missions, visions and values.

Premier Health

Mission

We will improve the health of the communities we serve with others who share our commitment to provide high quality, cost-competitive health services.

Vision

People will choose Premier Health over any health system in southwest Ohio. We will earn their choice, and grow our market leadership, by anticipating their needs and exceeding their expectations.

Values
  • RESPECT each person’s dignity.
  • Act with INTEGRITY to do the right thing in all aspects of our responsibilities.
  • Serve with COMPASSION that embraces each individual’s concerns and hopes.
  • Commit to EXCELLENCE as measured to the highest level of performance.

Our mission, vision and values drive our dedicated service to the community.

The University of Dayton

Mission

Our mission is simple, yet profound.

The University of Dayton is a top-tier Catholic research university with academic offerings from the undergraduate to the doctoral levels. We are a diverse community committed, in the Marianist tradition, to educating the whole person and linking learning and scholarship with leadership and service.

Core Beliefs
  • The University of Dayton is a comprehensive university.
  • The University of Dayton is a Catholic university.
  • The University of Dayton is committed to the Marianist tradition.

You’re Invited to the Fairgrounds to Future Progress Workshop

By | News

Come to the Coliseum at the Fairgrounds on January 25th at 6:00pm to hear a status update on the Fairgrounds to Future planning process. Participants will get to hear and see the progress being made on the plan for the site and offer input. Please RSVP below so we can plan accordingly. See you at the Fairgrounds on January 25th!

Fairgrounds to Future Progress Workshop

January 25, 2018

6:00-7:30pm at the Fairgrounds site (in the Coliseum)

RSVP

Please let us know if you plan to attend using the form below. By pre-registering you will also receive important updates on the planning process.

Please select a valid form

Impressive Start to the Fairgrounds to Future Planning Process!

By | News

More than 200 people came to the Coliseum at the Fairgrounds on November 2 to learn more about the Fairgrounds to Future planning process and offer their ideas for the future of the site. “What happens with this project could have an impact on the future of our communities,” said one workshop attendee. At the workshop, participants worked in small groups to share their ideas for the site and brainstorm additional possibilities. Then they voted on their top three priority ideas and discussed why they thought those were the most important. “Lots of great ideas,” said another participant. “[There are] people with a lot of emotional investment in this project who want this to succeed.”

Since the start of the Fairgrounds to Future process, nearly 500 people have shared their ideas at a workshop or online. In addition, 30 stakeholder groups have been interviewed. To date, more than 1,000 thoughts about the future of the fairgrounds have been collected. These ideas will help inform the vision for the site.

If you haven’t had a chance to participate yet, we still want to hear from you. Just visit the input page to contribute your ideas today.

You can check out some of the local media coverage of the event and process at the links below. Thanks to everyone for their participation!

Fairgrounds to Future Goals

By | News

The University of Dayton and Premier Health have drafted a set of overarching goals for the fairgrounds planning process and redevelopment. These goals will serve as a touchstone for more specific work. For the purpose of this work, a goal is defined as a “desired outcome expressed in simple terms.” The goals represent the highest aspirations of the University of Dayton and Premier Health for the planning process and redevelopment.

Process. The desired outcomes…

  1. Interested parties feel they have been heard through the various engagement opportunities.
  2. Facilitation aligns with the values of each institution (mission and identity).
  3. The larger community views the planning effort as a success.
  4. The two institutions—as well as other like-minded organizations—deepen their partnerships through implementation opportunities.

Place. The desired outcomes…

  1. Improvements to the site contribute to and are consistent with the values and missions of the institutions.
  2. Improvements to the site also advance the economic strength of the city and the health of the surrounding neighborhoods.
  3. The site—in its transformation—is authentic and remains a landmark and destination for Dayton.
  4. Businesses and a younger demographic (talent retention) are attracted to this place.
  5. The site is a safe, walkable place (foot traffic), with a mix of uses that is physically connected to adjacent places, including the river, and promotes healthy living.
  6. There is a long-term, forward-oriented approach to development that addresses emerging technology and land needs.

Economics. The desired outcomes…

  1. Development on the site will be supportive and complementary of other community planning and development initiatives.
  2. Residents in the city and surrounding neighborhoods have employment opportunities associated with the construction and final development.
  3. The redevelopment will leverage private and public investments for both this site and the surrounding community.
  4. A long-term leadership and ownership role is of interest to the institutions.

Premier Health and UD Invite Imaginative Ideas

By | News

Mary Boosalis, President and CEO of Premier Health

Eric Spina, President of the University of Dayton

As we shape a vision for the revitalization of the former Montgomery County fairgrounds, we invite the community to join with us Thursday, Nov. 2, to imagine the possibilities.

Positive change in our community does not happen in a vacuum, nor does it happen overnight. We will kick off the multi-year revitalization effort by inviting ideas — and listening carefully. No decisions have been made about any particular redevelopment projects on the 38-acre parcel.  We are starting with a blank canvas, are open to imaginative ideas, and want to foster a healthy, robust dialogue about what could be.

Imagine a vibrant pedestrian-friendly mixed-use development on the doorstep of downtown Dayton. Envision a place where inventive minds — faculty and staff, doctors and researchers, neighborhood residents and community leaders — can work, live and play. Visualize a place that sparks creativity, that echoes Dayton’s inventive spirit throughout the ages.

Let’s dream big — together. It’s time to breathe new life into what’s arguably the most desirable developable tract of land in the city, building on the momentum of downtown revitalization.

Our two institutions have a long history of collaboration, with an eye on revitalizing the southern edge of the city. In partnership with the City of Dayton, CityWide Development Corp. and County Corp., we worked together to rebuild housing in the Fairgrounds neighborhood, enabling home ownership to grow to 75 percent. In concert with community leaders and private developers, we helped attract new businesses, graduate student housing, bike lanes and decorative street lighting on Brown Street, which has emerged as one of the city’s most successful redevelopments.

We also co-sponsor a healthcare symposium on community health and UD students gain experience in Premier’s hospitals and clinics. It’s a mutually beneficial partnership that speaks of the power of collaborative leadership in our community.

That’s why community leaders are looking to us, as strong anchor institutions, to be good stewards of this land, to transform it for future generations.

That’s a responsibility we take seriously and thoughtfully. We have partnered with planning NEXT, a master planning and urban design firm based in Columbus, Ohio, to help us develop an inclusive process that invites genuine participation and leads to a master plan.  While our decisions will reflect the needs and values of our institutions, we want to create a vision that honors our commitment to the Dayton community that we serve.

What will success look like? We want to create a vibe — a sense of place that capitalizes on the innovative and entrepreneurial ethos of the city, university and health system. We will work collaboratively with planning NEXT and community stakeholders to design a vision for the property that advances the missions of Premier Health and UD, boosts the economic vitality of the city and adds to the stability and health of the surrounding neighborhoods.

Please join us at 6 p.m. Nov. 2, for a “Fairgrounds to Future” community conversation — an interactive workshop at the former fairgrounds that’s open to the public. Please RSVP for the workshop here. If you cannot attend, you may also share your ideas for the property, here.

We’re committed to transforming this land for the future. Our shared future. It starts with imagining the possibilities.

You’re Invited to the Fairgrounds to Future Workshop!

By | News

As part of the planning process, the partnership will provide a variety of opportunities this fall for meaningful input from community groups and other stakeholders as the vision for the development takes shape. The first opportunity will be the Fairgrounds to Future Workshop on November 2, 2017.

Participants will get to learn about the planning process and work together in small groups to discuss opportunities for the neighborhood, institutions, city and region.

Fairgrounds to Future Workshop

November 2, 2017

6:00-7:30pm at the Fairgrounds site (in the Coliseum)

RSVP

Please let us know if you plan to attend using the form below. By pre-registering you will also receive important updates on the planning process.

Please select a valid form

What They’re Saying

By | News

“This is such an exciting opportunity for the city of Dayton. As anchor institutions, the University and Premier Health have excellent track records whenever they do development. We know this project will be done with care and attention to the community’s wants and input.” – Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley

“We could not be happier with the thoughtful way in which UD and Premier are approaching the redevelopment of the Fairgrounds property. It took about five years of work by many community partners to get to this point, and we’re very confident that UD and Premier, as the new owners of the Montgomery County Fairgrounds, will redevelop the property to the benefit of the entire region for the next 100 years.” – Montgomery County Commission President Dan Foley

“University of Dayton and Premier Health continue their leadership in our community with today’s step forward in developing the former Montgomery County fairgrounds. With their leadership and investment, the former fairgrounds will reach its full potential and spur job creation and economic growth in the city.” – U.S. Rep. Mike Turner

“This historic parcel of land is important to so many in our region. I am grateful to Premier Health and the University of Dayton for welcoming public input on its future, and excited to begin the process of re-imagining its use.” – Sen. Bill Beagle

“Carillon Park is excited to learn more about the future of the former fairgrounds property, and is delighted to take part in the community discussion that will help guide the new beginning for the historic and strategically located acreage. The property is situated at the center of so many good things happening in Dayton.” – Dayton History President & CEO Brady Kress

Share your ideas with the planning team!

By | News

If you have ideas about the former fairgrounds site, please share them with the planning team. Share your contact information to receive project updates.

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Firm Selected to Develop Master Plan for Former Fairgrounds Property

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In coming months, the planning process for transforming the property – “Fairgrounds to Future: Transforming for Tomorrow” – will yield opportunities for meaningful input from individuals, community groups and other stakeholders. One opportunity for public input will be an interactive workshop, to be held from 6:00-7:30pm on November 2 at the former fairgrounds. The workshop also will be an occasion for representatives of both institutions and planning NEXT to share details of the five-month planning process.